The Halloween Horror of the London Underground

london monsterr

During the 1990s, the London Underground was facing a very strange happening. Trains kept breaking down between Baker Street and Edgware Road. The affected trains would lose all power on the line between the two stations—travellers would find themselves in darkness, and commuters and staff started to become very concerned. The management was forced to conduct an investigation into what was happening and believed that a major fault lay under the section of track causing the power to fail on the trains.
The Circle Line could well be the oldest underground railway line in the world. Its beginnings can be traced back to 1863. In the early 1900s, the track was renovated to become electrified, but when the breakdowns started in the early 1990s, electrical engineering experts could not find the problem, and for the first time, even the experts were stumped.

In desperation, the London Underground operators asked the public if they had any ideas what was causing the breakdowns. The overwhelming response was not sparks, smoke or any other such worldly thing. The majority of the responses suggested the paranormal.

One of those who answered the London Underground operators claimed that she had been travelling the line for fifteen years and alleged that she had always felt something was wrong with that section of the track. According to her, passengers passing through after leaving Baker Street would have “panic” attacks.

Another passenger who had been caught in one of the breakdowns explained that after the train broke down, the passengers noticed that there were several “figures” standing outside of their carriage. There were several accounts of these strange figures.

After receiving such strange reports, the operators of the Underground started to look into the engineering records of that part of the tube system. The records went back over one hundred years, and due to the diligent record keeping of the London Underground, it seemed that between the 1800s and 1990, workers on that section of track had found fragments of bone and teeth.

The British Museum was called in to help by the operators of the London Underground, and it was proven that the track ran over the site of a huge medieval plague pit that was said to have held the bodies of 20,000 victims. The management of the Underground had that stretch of track blessed and sprinkled with holy water. After that, the problem disappeared and has not returned… Yet

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